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    General Information
    1. My property information is wrong. How do I get it changed?
    2. How current is the information on your site?
    3. I don't want my information available on the internet. How do I get it deleted?
    4. Why do I get an error message that says 'Request Timed Out'?
    Homestead, Over 65 and Disabled Exemptions
    1. What is a general homestead exemption?
    2. How do I qualify for the general homestead exemption?
    3. Do I need to reapply every year for my homestead
    4. When and where do I apply for my homestead exemption?
    5. Am I eligible for additional exemptions when I turn 65?
    6. I am a surviving spouse. Am I eligible for any exemption benefits?
    7. I am a disabled veteran. Am I entitled to any property tax deductions?
    8. I am a homeowner with disabilities. Am I entitled to any exemptions?
    9. What information must I provide to obtain a homestead exemption.
    10. Is there a fee to apply for an exemption?
    Appraisal Process
    1. What is a Notice of Appraised Value?
    2. Who receives a Notice of Appraised Value?
    3. What should I do when I receive a Notice of Appraised Value?
    4. What is the deadline to file my protest?
    5. Can I resolve my questions informally?
    6. What is the Appraisal Review Board?
    7. What happens after I file a formal protest?
    8. What information should the appraisal district provide about my property?
    9. What if I cannot make or miss my hearing?
    10. What if I disagree with the Appraisal Review Board's decision?
    11. How is my residence appraised?
    Business Personal Property Renditions
    1. Who must file a rendition report?
    2. Do I have to file a Rendition Form for my business?
    3. When is the deadline to file a Rendition?
    4. What types of property must be rendered?
    5. Is my information confidential?
    6. What if I received a rendition form but I do not own the business or closed the business or moved locations?
    7. What is rendition for Business Personal Property?
    FAQ

    General Information

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    QMy property information is wrong. How do I get it changed?
    AContact Lubbock Central Appraisal District at (806)762-5000 or email us at info@lubbockcad.org. Our office is located at 2109 Ave Q.

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    QHow current is the information on your site?
    AThe information is real time. Changes are reflected as they are made.

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    QI don't want my information available on the internet. How do I get it deleted?
    AThe data that is being presented on this website is public record and available under laws governing the public's right to access public information. We cannot selectively remove or withhold this information. There are exceptions for certain individuals. If you have questions about whether or not you qualify to have certain property information confidential, please contact our office or refer to the Request for Confidentiality form on this website.

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    QWhy do I get an error message that says 'Request Timed Out'?
    AThis error generally occurs when the search criteria is too broad to complete the search before the set time limit. Narrow the search down by providing additional search criteria.

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    FAQ

    Homestead, Over 65 and Disabled Exemptions

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    QWhat is a general homestead exemption?
    AThe general homestead exemption is provided by state law for owner-occupied residential properties. The exemption removes a portion of your value from taxation providing a lower tax amount for the homestead property.

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    QHow do I qualify for the general homestead exemption?
    AIn order to qualify for this exemption you must have owned and occupied the property as of January 1st of that tax year. This property must also be your principal residence and you may not claim another homestead on another piece of property.

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    QDo I need to reapply every year for my homestead
    ANo. You do not have to reapply unless the chief appraiser requests a new application or you move to a new residence.

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    QWhen and where do I apply for my homestead exemption?
    AYou may apply in person at Lubbock Central Appraisal District between January 1st and April 30th of the tax year. You may file for late HS exemption up to one year after the date which the taxes become delinquent. There is never a fee to apply for a homestead application. The form is also available on our website.

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    QAm I eligible for additional exemptions when I turn 65?
    AIf you are age 65 or older your residence homestead will qualify for additional exemption deductions and you will receive a tax ceiling for that home on your school taxes. Refer to the exemption table for exemptions and tax ceilings offered by each taxing unit. You qualify for the exemption in the year your turn 65. You do not have to be 65 on January 1.

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    QI am a surviving spouse. Am I eligible for any exemption benefits?
    AIf a homeowner who has been receiving the tax ceiling on school taxes dies, the ceiling transfers to the surviving spouse, if the survivor is 55 or older and has ownership in the home. The survivor must apply to the appraisal district for the tax ceiling to transfer.

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    QI am a disabled veteran. Am I entitled to any property tax deductions?
    AYou may qualify for a property tax deduction if you are either (1) a veteran who was disabled while serving with the U.S. armed forces or (2) the surviving spouse or child (under 18 years of age or unmarried) of a disabled veteran. You must be a Texas resident and must provide documentation from the Veteran's Administration reflecting the percentage of your service-connected disability. Your disability rating must be at least 10%. The exemption amount varies depending on the disability level. This exemption is different from the 100% Disabled Veteran Exemption. Refer to the section on 100% disabled veteran exemptions for additional information.

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    QI am a homeowner with disabilities. Am I entitled to any exemptions?
    AA person with a disability may get exemptions if (1) you can't engage in gainful work because of physical or mental disability or (2) you are 55 years old and blind and can't engage in your previous work because of your blindness. If you receive disability benefits under the Federal Old Age, Survivors, and Disability Insurance Program through the Social Security Administration you should qualify. Disability benefits from any other program do not automatically qualify. Refer to the exemption table taxing units that grant the disability exemption and/or tax ceiling.

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    QWhat information must I provide to obtain a homestead exemption.
    AEffective for exemptions filed after September 1, 2011 you must provide a copy of your driver's license or state identification card and must include a vehicle registration receipt. If you do not owne a vehicle, you must provide an affidavit to that effect and a copy of a utility bill for the property in the applicant's name.

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    QIs there a fee to apply for an exemption?
    AThere is NEVER a fee to apply for any exemption.

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    FAQ

    Appraisal Process

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    QWhat is a Notice of Appraised Value?
    AThe Notice of Appraised Value gives information about your property such as legal description, situs, taxing units, current year proposed value and exemptions and prior year value and exemptions. Included with the notice are a protest form and other information about the appraisal process.

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    QWho receives a Notice of Appraised Value?
    ANotices are mailed to all real property that had an increase in value over the prior year greater than $100, mailing address changed, ownership transferred or the value was rendered. All business personal property, mineral interests, and mobile homes receive a Notice of Appraised Value.

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    QWhat should I do when I receive a Notice of Appraised Value?
    AIf you agree with the value on your property you do not have to do anything. If you do not agree with value you should file a formal protest. A protest form is included with the Notice of Appraised Value.

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    QWhat is the deadline to file my protest?
    AYou have 30 days from the date of the Notice of Appraised Value or May 31st, whichever is later.

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    QCan I resolve my questions informally?
    AAppraisal district staff meets informally with property owners about values. You should always file your formal protest to preserve your right to protest to the ARB. Questions about exemptions, property description and taxing units can usually be resolved without a formal protest.

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    QWhat is the Appraisal Review Board?
    AThe Appraisal Review Board (ARB) is an independent, impartial group of citizens authorized to resolve disputes between taxpayers and the appraisal district. The ARB is appointed by the appraisal district board of directors but is not controlled by the appraisal district.

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    QWhat happens after I file a formal protest?
    AAt least 14 days prior to your hearing, the appraisal district will mail you information about the date and time of your hearing, a copy of the Appraisal Review Board procedures, and a copy of Property Taxpayer Remedies.

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    QWhat information should the appraisal district provide about my property?
    AUpon request, you may inspect and obtain a copy of the data, schedules, formulas and any other information that will be used by the appraisal district at your hearing. This information is not required to be delivered 14 days before a hearing.

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    QWhat if I cannot make or miss my hearing?
    AYou will be allowed one reschedule if you contact the ARB one day prior to your hearing time. If you fail to appear, you may lose the right to be heard by the ARB. If you are not represented by an agent and you fail to appear at a hearing, you are entitled to a new hearing if you file with the ARB, not later than four days after your hearing date, a written statement showing good cause for failing to appear.

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    QWhat if I disagree with the Appraisal Review Board's decision?
    AAfter your hearing the ARB will send a written order by certified mail stating the results of the hearing. Depending on the facts and type of property, you may be able to appeal to the state district court or to an independent arbitrator appointed by the comptroller. You may appeal through binding arbitration if your property is valued at $1 million or less or if the property is your residence homestead regardless of its appraised value. Contact the appraisal district for additional information.

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    QHow is my residence appraised?
    AIn order for the Appraisal District to appraise all properties in the county, a mass appraisal system is used. This system provides for the appraisal of more than 135,000 properties of which approximately 80,000 are homes. All improved residential property is classed on a scale from 1 to 15. Quality, architectural design, and building attributes determine the class. A substantial majority of Lubbock County homes are classified within the class 4 to 10 range. Similarly classed properties within a neighborhood are appraised using sales of comparable properties. A neighborhood can be as small as just a few square blocks or as large as one square mile. The market dictates established boundaries of over 700 defined neighborhoods. Residences are appraised primarily based on what similar properties in a neighborhood sold for on a price per square foot basis during the twelve month period prior to the January 1 date of appraisal. The Appraisal District compares the most recent appraised values of sold properties to the recent sale prices. If the neighborhood is less than or greater than 100%, a neighborhood adjustment is made to every property in the neighborhood. Neighborhood adjustments are used to adjust all similar properties equally within the defined neighborhood after determining the level of appraisal. The level of appraisal is calculated by an appraisal to sale price ratio of all qualifying recently sold homes in the defined neighborhood. This process compares the most recent appraised value to the sale price of the sold property. The median property value is used to determine the level of appraisal for the neighborhood. The formula to calculate an individual home value is: SQUARE FOOTAGE X UNIT PRICE X CONDITION PERCENTAGE X NEIGHBORHOOD ADJUSTMENT=APPRAISED VALUE This formula is repeated for each area type of the home (main living area, second story, garage, shop, etc.) The land value is then added to the home value to determine the total appraised value of the individual residential property.

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    FAQ

    Business Personal Property Renditions

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    QWho must file a rendition report?
    AA person who owns tangible personal property used for the production of income, or who manages or controls such property as an authorized agent, must file a report annually

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    QDo I have to file a Rendition Form for my business?
    AYes. If you don't file, the account will be subject to a 10% penalty.

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    QWhen is the deadline to file a Rendition?
    AThe deadline to file is April 15. If you mail your rendition, it must be postmarked by the U.S. Postal Service on or before April 15. You may request for an extension until May 15. The request must be made by April 15. The deadline for Freeport Application is April 30.

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    QWhat types of property must be rendered?
    AAny personal property that is used in a business or used to produce income must be rendered. This property includes furniture and fixtures, equipment, machinery, computers, inventory held for sale or rental, raw materials, finished goods, and work in process. You are not required to render intangible personal property (property that can be owned but does not have a physical form) such as cash, accounts receivable, goodwill, application computer software, and other similar items. If your organization has previously qualified for an exemption that applies to personal property, for example, a religious or charitable organization exemption, you are not required to render the exempt property.

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    QIs my information confidential?
    AYes. Information contained in a rendition cannot be disclosed to third parties except in very limited circumstances. In addition, the Texas Property Tax Code specifically provides that any estimate of value you provide is not admissible in proceedings other than a protest to the Appraisal Review Board (ARB) or court proceedings related to penalties for failure to render. The final value we place on your property is public information, but your rendition is not. The Legislature did not change the statutes governing confidentiality of rendition statements and supporting statements. SB 340 does not prohibit a chief appraiser from using the rendition and supporting statements as a part of the evidence presented in a protest before the Appraisal Review Board. In this case, it does become a part of the public record.

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    QWhat if I received a rendition form but I do not own the business or closed the business or moved locations?
    AIf the business was sold, closed, or moved prior to January 1: If you did not own the business, state that you did not own that business for that year. State who you sold it to, the date you sold it, or the date the business closed and sign the form. If you moved to a different location, update the location of the business and complete the rendition form. If the business was sold, closed, or moved after January 1: The rendition must be filed and most importantly a good mailing address and phone number should be included on the rendition to refer to when reviewed by an appraiser

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    QWhat is rendition for Business Personal Property?
    AA rendition is simply a form that provides the following information for personal property that you own: Property owner's name and address Description of the property by type or category Description and quantity of each type of inventory Property's physical location or taxable situs Property owner's option of providing either a "good" faith estimate of market value or historical cost new and year of acquisition of individual items The appraisal district uses the information to help estimate the market value of your property for taxation purposes.

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